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Recent News

Patent Scholar, Expert on Equity Issues, Hired to Join Chicago-Kent Faculty

As a practicing patent attorney, Jordana Goodman began noticing a problem. “I really liked practicing, because I went to law school so I could help people,” she says. “But there...

Diversity by the Numbers

Editor's note: this is a story from the the Fall 2022 Chicago-Kent Magazine. To read the magazine in full, follow this link. Michael Wilder ’06 wasn’t much of a numbers...

The “Generalist” at DEI’s Forefront

Editor's note: this is a story from the the Fall 2022 Chicago-Kent Magazine. To read the magazine in full, follow this link. To this day, Nicholas Cummings ’08 speaks against...

In the Media

Professor Edward Lee Cited in Story About 'Banned Words' in Federal Court

“The term ‘patent troll’ may operate as a moral panic in a way that is detrimental to reasoned analysis and consideration of the root problems related to the issue of abusive patent litigation tactics,” Lee wrote in a law review article. Given the nature of the term and the negative way it has been used in news articles, he concluded that it would be prejudicial in the context of a patent trial.

Bloomberg Law

Chicago-Kent Professor Harold Krent Debunks SAFE-T Act Myths

Under the SAFE-T Act, people charged with serious crimes such as second-degree murder and kidnapping “can be detained based on a finding of potential dangerousness,” said Harold Krent, professor at the Chicago-Kent College of Law. “To detain, there must be particular facts demonstrating serious risk. Or the individual can be detained because of a risk of flight.”

FactCheck.org

Professor Emeritus Henry H. Perritt Analyzes Changes in Labor Force

“Savings accumulated during the COVID lockdown, combined with high COVID-impact payments, made it possible for a substantial part of the workforce, at all income levels, to drop out and maintain lifestyles,” said Henry H. Perritt, professor emeritus at the Chicago-Kent College of Law. “The booming economy after the COVID lockdown encouraged workers to think they could demand higher rates of pay if they quit and sought other jobs.”

WalletHub